Blog

Representation in the UK’s Judiciary: Where’s the Missing Link?

When judicial diversity is discussed, it often focuses on the extent to which women and black or minority ethnic groups (BME) are under-represented. On occasions, it also considers legal background, education, disability and other factors.[1] Continue reading “Representation in the UK’s Judiciary: Where’s the Missing Link?”

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Strengthening Multiculturalism: British Curricula and Community Initiatives

Multiculturalism in the UK strives to balance respect for diversity with a sense of shared national belonging.1 In the current political climate, key multicultural approaches have been increasingly contested; yet these approaches remain crucial.  Continue reading “Strengthening Multiculturalism: British Curricula and Community Initiatives”

Snapshot: Misinformation and Global Health

In the interconnected world in which we live, information — both accurate and inaccurate — spreads quickly and widely across a variety of platforms. The spread of inaccurate information online, particularly through social media, has serious implications for global health, as can be seen in the proliferation and impact of anti-vaccination movements.  Continue reading “Snapshot: Misinformation and Global Health”

Mental Health and Natural Disasters

The impacts of natural disasters are usually indicated by death toll, damage to property and economic withdrawals. What often goes unseen are the mental health issues victims sustain after witnessing their hard-earned life get annihilated. A hurricane or earthquake may only last a moment but the mental trauma that the people bear lasts a lifetime. Continue reading “Mental Health and Natural Disasters”

“Fort Trump” and the Russian Threat in the Central-Eastern Europe

With the September visit of Polish President Andrzej Duda to the US and his meeting with US President Donald Trump, Poland once again raised the question of a stronger American military presence in the country. During the briefing session in the White House, President Duda said that he hopes both countries will jointly build a permanent American military base in Poland, which he referred to as “Fort Trump”.[1]   Continue reading ““Fort Trump” and the Russian Threat in the Central-Eastern Europe”

Kirkuk: City of Gold

Over the past year Iraq was liberated from the hold of ISIS.1 Prior to the liberation, political and economic activity was halted, and two main regional groups, the Iraqi central government and Kurdish regional government, came together with the help of the United States to push ISIS out of Iraq. One particular city, Kirkuk, in northern Iraq, is of great interest to the two regional authorities because it holds 40% of Iraq’s oil reserves.2  In order to understand Iraq’s new oil policy, it is first important to understand the regional relationship between the Arabs and the Kurds, and why Kirkuk is at the top of everyone’s agenda.  Continue reading “Kirkuk: City of Gold”

The End of Independent Education?

Continuing with our theme of inequalities in education, King’s Think Tank recently held a debate on the motion: “Independent Schools should be Integrated into the State System”. The event went ahead despite snowy conditions, although one speaker was unable to travel. This left Mr Michael Pyke, Press Officer for the Campaign for State Education (CASE), with the task of proposing the motion on his own. He was against the formidable team of Mr Charles Fillingham, Headmaster of Francis Holland School, and Dr Eamonn Butler, Director of the Adam Smith Institute. The debate was chaired by King’s Think Tank’s own Bertie O’Brien. Continue reading “The End of Independent Education?”