The Institutional Relationship between the EU and the East: Is Europe in Critical Condition?

On Tuesday, February 10th, a launch event was held at the UK Parliament in order to commemorate the first issue of the publication Trouble in the Neighbourhood. The journal focuses on the complex range of policy issues that Europe is facing, and it poses creative solutions to the region’s complex problems. The publication is just one aspect of the Foreign Policy Centre’s new project, which encourages think tanks and universities to craft policy recommendations and to engage in the broader European community. Continue reading “The Institutional Relationship between the EU and the East: Is Europe in Critical Condition?”

How do we fill in the Gaps in Education Policy? A Look at the US and the UK.

It almost goes without saying that education is the key to success. But it does still need to be said, because huge achievement gaps in primary and secondary education stubbornly persist in both the United States and the UK. Children from different socioeconomic, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds are simply not awarded the same educational opportunities, a discrepancy that has profound consequences for their chances later in life. This gap is often quantifiable. For example, why is it that in 2008 test scores for black seventeen-year-olds in the US, as opposed to their white seventeen-year-old peers, reflected a difference in learning approximately equivalent to three fewer years of school? Why are there two black Caribbean students for every three white British students in the highest testing tier at age fourteen, even when these students’ test scores at age eleven were equivalent? Clearly, something crucial is missing in the approaches that both countries currently take to educating diverse groups of students. The question that follows is whether current policy is capable of addressing these trends, and, if not, what the most effective and efficient policies might be. Continue reading “How do we fill in the Gaps in Education Policy? A Look at the US and the UK.”

What is the Current Framework Behind Military Exports Regulation in the UK?

At the panel discussion on the global defence industry we tried to understand the framework behind the regulation of military export licenses in the United Kingdom. Professor Trevor Taylor, who is currently working at the Defence Management at the Royal United Services Institute, mainly spoke about the current structure of military export regulations. As he explained, the United Kingdom operates under the European code conduct – or at least in theory. This conduct consists mainly of eight criteria that all the members of the European Union – even the United Kingdom – are required to follow. Continue reading “What is the Current Framework Behind Military Exports Regulation in the UK?”

Universal Health Coverage: The Future of Africa?

On Thursday February the 5th, King’s Think Tank hosted the first global health event of the second semester, welcoming the expertise of world-renowned health economists and lecturers. Speakers included Mr. Robert Yates, Senior Fellow in Chatham House and Project Director of the UHC Policy Forum, Dr. Josephine Borghi
Health Economist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Dr. Sridhar Venkatapuram, Lecturer in Global Health and Philosophy, at King’s College London. Continue reading “Universal Health Coverage: The Future of Africa?”

Transatlantic Trade: A Solution to Economic Stagnation or a Destroyer of European Standards?

TTIP, or the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, is an agreement between the US and the EU that emphasizes the depreciation of tariffs and the assuagement of trade regulations. While the deal will promote market accessibility, it will have serious consequences for major trade sectors, including pharmaceuticals, energy, clothing, and finance. Continue reading “Transatlantic Trade: A Solution to Economic Stagnation or a Destroyer of European Standards?”